Back to the future: The convergence of the online and real worlds

Peter Steiner cartoon

Increasingly in today’s online world, it seems that in order to be heard, one must also be seen. As one student pointed out, if you remain anonymous online, you won’t be taken seriously.

Failing flat on my face

Michael Marcotte

No one’s idea is a failure. But translating an idea into a real world solution takes action, teamwork, buy-in, testing, etc. Failure is part of that process. The trick is to get some traction first.

The rise of the “persocial” web

Adriano Farano

Consequences of a new generation of digital products and services where personal and social dimensions melt together to put every person at the center of the game.

What should the New York Times do?

Paddy Hirsch

For years there’s been rumbling discontent among journalists about the way media organizations take pains to look after their staffers when they’re caught in the line of fire, but often fail to provide support to the locals who make it possible for those staffers to get the story.

The journalism fellowship as a bridge

2011 Knight Fellows Angelo Izama, Seda Muradyan, Karelia Vazquez and Mike Marcotte

Here in the Knight Journalism Fellowship, despite many differences, we fellows proceed together. The sharing and mutual support is such a joyous part of the experience that no one feels alone while looking over the rail into the chasm of unknowns.

Public radio’s only hope: hope

Vivian Schiller, NPR

Let me try to inject a few baseline facts and a little Stanford-style hope into the dialogue about NPR, public radio, and the pursuit of trustworthy journalism.

Pick news profits over public good? Lose financial perks

The New York Times building

Apparently the taxpayer-funded bailout of Wall Street has dulled our sense of moral outrage as well as our pocketbooks. It certainly makes it more convenient to dispatch with the corporate news industry’s feigned interest in public welfare

How we’re financing meaningful journalism

Jeremy Adam Smith

I launched an exploratory survey to discover how journalists are getting their most important work done in an age of shrinking resources.

Eighteen days in Egypt: Creating a crowd-sourced documentary

2011 Knight Fellow Jigar Mehta

Can we tell the story of the Egyptian revolution with the same tools that helped share it with the world in real time?

Dan Archer on comics journalism

Dan Archer on comics journalism

Knight Fellow Dan Archer recently spoke with Stanford journalism students about visual storytelling.

Inside Pulse, the news app

Ankit Gupta, Pulse

Pulse founders Ankit Gupta and Akshay Kothari created the visual news reader last spring as students in the Stanford d.school’s Launch Pad class.

A quest to use mobile for citizen reporting

Jenka Soderberg

In this short video, Soderberg discusses her project that will allow citizen journalist to report to their local newsroom whats happening in their neighborhood.

My Eureka moment

Congolese children

After 20 amazing years with the news agency as a foreign correspondent, bureau chief and manager, I saw the next phase of my career: A journalist who would advocate for the empowerment of women and girls.

The life of one Knight, so far …

Knight Fellows Hugo Soskin, Dan Archer and Paddy Hirsch

Here’s February knocking on the door and I’m wondering where all my carefully chronicled Knight exploits have gone. So here’s my attempt to sum up what’s happened over the last few weeks at Stanford.

Fellow wins grant for social news game

2011 Knight Fellow Seda Muradyan

In this short video, Knight Fellow Seda Muradyan discusses her dream of launching a social news game to encourage citizen journalists in Armenia.

Thinking about starting a news venture?

CafeBabel.com

Adriano Farano spoke to the Knight Fellows last night about his experience starting the multilingual European news website CaféBabel.

Ideate or die?

Designer in Society Class

Stanford’s d.school urges us to work up some ideas, sketch them out on a few pages and start road-testing them. And if those ideas suck, try some others – after all, the only way to find out what works is to ideate, ideate, ideate.

Start doing, stop thinking

d.school brainstorming session

I was sitting at my laptop in the center atrium of Stanford’s design school when I spotted my professor, Bernie Roth. He gave me a serious look: “I hope you’re not thinking.” “No, no, no,” I assured him, shuffling some papers in an effort to create some semblance of activity. Yep, here at one of the world’s most prestigious universities, …

The power of design thinking

Design thinking is a mindset and a process. One that roughly follows the path of Empathy, Define, Ideate, Prototype, and Test.

Jonathan Zittrain and astroturfing

I’m going to post pages from my sketchbook from some of the lectures I attend this semester. Last night’s was part of the Liberation Technology series and featured Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain discussing the ethical pitfalls and perils of crowdsourced jobs.

Zen and the art of course selection

Sculpture

Every day I’d get emails or see flyers or hear about a lecture by some famous person, a film screening, a seminar by a leading economist, an art showing or a luncheon that would be great to go to. Except I had class.